Engineering - general

Discipline Group: 

Engineering

Peanut butter and jelly: The edible algorithm

The Arizona Chief Science Officer (CSO) program, supported by State Farm, gets students involved in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) activities, while teaching them about careers in these fields. During a CSO institute, State Farm volunteers used a childhood favorite – the PB&J, to demonstrate the importance of algorithms. Students plotted the steps needed to build the perfect PB&J, then shared their algorithms with volunteers – who played the role of a computer.

 

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Conversations: Startups need our students to buck up

In December, software companies WebPT and Galvanize are set to bring more than 800 new employees to the area as they renovate a 120,000 square foot building on Grant Street. How can the Arizona Commerce Authority continue to attract even more companies and convince them that the Phoenix region is the center of STEM and innovation? How will they convince startups that we’ve got the talent to build their workforce? Arizona SciTech is collaborating with ACA to help.

 

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SIUE’s “Digital East St. Louis” inspires local students to explore city’s history and culture

Students from East St. Louis are documenting the culture and history of their hometown, while gaining valuable knowledge and computer skills, by participating in Southern Illinois University Edwardsville's Digital East St. Louis program. Now in its third year, the program continues to incorporate new interactive projects for the students, with the underlying goal of inspiring a love for STEM through creative digital humanities content.

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SciGirls Profiles: Women in STEM

These women are the innovators, problem-solvers and dreamers who live right next door. They’re passionate about their work, hobbies, families and helping to make the world a better place.

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You Can Take it With You: Empowering Learners Across Contexts

A central way in which FUSE provides powerful learning affordances is by breaking down the silos of A key way in which FUSE provides powerful learning affordances is by breaking down the silos of traditional STEM disciplines, and engaging learners in more authentic, interdisciplinary, and personally meaningful experimentation ICLS 2016 Proceedings 1029 © ISLS and making (e.g., Dewey, 1897; Resnick et al., 2009).

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Learner Choice and the Emergence of Diverse Learning Arrangements in FUSE

This paper explores how FUSE Studios are organized, describing key design elements, the ways these differ from a traditional classroom model, and the types of diverse learning arrangements that emerge. Data in this paper was primarily collected from five classrooms in the 2013-14 school year and the analysis was refined through discussions within the research team about ongoing data collection during the 2014-15 (one classroom) and 2015- 16 (seven classrooms) school years.

[See pages 1025-1032]

 

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Developing and Recognizing Relative Expertise in FUSE

Traditional methods of STEM education position the child as a novice and create narrow opportunities for children to demonstrate and constructively utilize their developing skills, related interests and capabilities, perhaps even inadvertently suppressing them (Stevens, 2000; Bevan, Bell, Stevens, & Razfar, 2012; Barron, 2006).

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Modeling and Simulation: How Everything seems to Form and Grow

The ideas in this article resulted from many years of research in engineering, physics, computer, and cognitive sciences, as well as teaching experience in college and 

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Epistemological, Psychological, Neurosciences, and Cognitive Essence of Computational Thinking

The construct of computational thinking (CT) was popularized a decade ago as an “attitude and skillset” for everyone. However, since it is equated with thinking by computer scientists, the teaching of these skills poses many challenges at K-12 because of their reliance on the use of electronic computers and programming concepts that are often found too abstract and difficult by young students.

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Exploring the Engineering Design Process Through Computer-Aided Design and 3-D Printing

This publication reports on how to use engineering design to solve problems by students in Grade 6-8. It is approximately $25 per class (if you already own a 3-D printer).

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