Conference proceeding

Computational Thinking in Elementary and Secondary Teacher Education

Computational thinking (CT) is broadly defined as the mental activity for abstracting problems and formulating solutions that can be automated. In an increasingly information-based society, CT is becoming an essential skill for everyone. To ensure that students develop this ability at the K-12 level, it is important to provide teachers with an adequate knowledge about CT and how to incorporate it into their teaching.

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Leveraging a Multi-Partner Approach to Develop Successful STEM Outreach Programs

Careers in the U.S. that require STEM knowledge have grown rapidly, reinforcing the need to develop a future workforce that is prepared to meet growing business needs and solve global challenges. Considering that there is a low number of students pursuing STEM degrees and the low percentages of minority students in the STEM pipeline, STEM education has been a focus of local and national education curriculum reform efforts.

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Social and Critical Consciousness Across the Engineering Curriculum

Driven by scholarly work that promotes incorporating the study of social justice issues in the engineering curriculum, this work-in-progress paper focuses on teaching social and critical consciousness in engineering.

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Building Automation and IoT as a Platform for Introducing STEM Education in K-12

There is growing concern in the United States about the lack of interest and aptitude in science, math and, in particular, technology and engineering disciplines. Certainly one reason for this could be the lack of true engineering experiences available to students when they are in junior high and high school. This is in part due to the fact that while most teachers are well versed in math and science through their formal education, very few have experience and/or educational backgrounds in engineering and technology.

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Creating Socially Relevant Mobile Apps: Infusing Computing into Middle School Curricula in Two School Districts

 In this paper, we share our experiences implementing a professional development program in two school districts with middle school teachers who integrated an introductory computer science curriculum into their teaching. The 15 to 20–hour curriculum was based on students collaboratively creating mobile apps for socially relevant purposes with MIT App Inventor. Eleven teachers infused the curriculum into technology, math, engineering, library and art courses. We investigated how teachers modified the curriculum to fit their respective standards and students’ needs.

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Changes in Teacher Dispositions Among Participants in Hands-on Teaching of a STEM Curriculum

Contrasts in Climate Change Attitudes and STEM Dispositions Among Children Versus Adults Attending a Science and Technology Exposition

Children and adults attending a three-day Science and Technology Exposition in Washington D.C., during April 2016 completed Climate Change Attitude Surveys and  STEM Semantic Differential Surveys while visiting a booth featuring hands on demonstrations of testing various  houshold appliances for consumption of standby power. Demos were conducted by middle school teachers from three states in the USA as part of a four-year Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) project, funded by NSF.

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You Can Take it With You: Empowering Learners Across Contexts

A central way in which FUSE provides powerful learning affordances is by breaking down the silos of A key way in which FUSE provides powerful learning affordances is by breaking down the silos of traditional STEM disciplines, and engaging learners in more authentic, interdisciplinary, and personally meaningful experimentation ICLS 2016 Proceedings 1029 © ISLS and making (e.g., Dewey, 1897; Resnick et al., 2009).

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Learner Choice and the Emergence of Diverse Learning Arrangements in FUSE

This paper explores how FUSE Studios are organized, describing key design elements, the ways these differ from a traditional classroom model, and the types of diverse learning arrangements that emerge. Data in this paper was primarily collected from five classrooms in the 2013-14 school year and the analysis was refined through discussions within the research team about ongoing data collection during the 2014-15 (one classroom) and 2015- 16 (seven classrooms) school years.

[See pages 1025-1032]

 

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Developing and Recognizing Relative Expertise in FUSE

Traditional methods of STEM education position the child as a novice and create narrow opportunities for children to demonstrate and constructively utilize their developing skills, related interests and capabilities, perhaps even inadvertently suppressing them (Stevens, 2000; Bevan, Bell, Stevens, & Razfar, 2012; Barron, 2006).

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