Cultural Relevance, Equity, and Diversity

Teaching kids about complex systems is valuable

ITEST project GUTS y Girls is mentioned as part of a Santa Fe New Mexican article on the Santa Fe Institute and its efforts to increase children's interest in STEM.

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Audio: girls and careers in science, technology, engineering, and math

On the Santa Fe Radio Cafe, ITEST project GUTS y Girls manager Kathryn Ugoretz and GUTS y Girls student participants Sara Hartse and Celeste Hernandez describe some of the challenges of encouraging young women to pursue career paths in science, technology, engineering, and math.

Listen to their interview on the Santa Fe Radio Cafe (February 13, 2013).

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GUTS y Girls engages tomorrow’s women in science & math

GUTS y Girls is a three-year ITEST project designed to attract New Mexico girls to careers in STEM -- fields in which women are historically under-represented.  Once-a-month Saturday workshops in Santa Fe will offer girls the opportunity to meet women scientists and professionals, participate in hands-on projects, and learn about career options. Two-week summer workshops are being held in Santa Fe, Albuquerque, and Las Cruces.

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Branching out: modeling topics in social science

ITEST project GUTS y Girls, in partnership with Arizona State University professor Dan Hruschka, has developed a new curriculum to engage students in understanding how computing and complex adaptive systems play an essential role in the social sciences. Geared towards the high school level, the curriculum has students explore questions and test their own assumptions using methods and data from the social sciences and computer modeling in NetLogo, a text-based computer programming language.

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Science of Friendship

In this pilot Project GUTS unit, presented by ITEST project GUTS y girls, high school girls explore questions and test their own assumptions on why humans help some people and not others. Using methods and data from the social sciences (anthropology, sociology and psychology) and computer modeling in NetLogo, a text-based computer programming language, students investigate the role of cooperation in human interactions—and how cooperation plays a role in global issues such as resource management, health equity and climate change.

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WEPAN - Call for Conference Proposals

WEPAN (Women in Engineering ProActive Network) is excited to convene the 2015 Change Leader Forum: Roadmap to Inclusion: Engineering Excellence for the 21st Century, in Broomfield, CO, from June 9-11, 2015. Pre-conference workshops and an evening kick-off event are scheduled for June 9th for both novice and expert participants working to promote women in engineering change initiatives.

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Wit Helps Women in Computer Science Combat Ignorance

As a minority in the upper levels of the computing profession, women are sometimes mistreated through ignorance or malice. Some women have learned to respond with wit and panache.

This article is part of a special issue of the Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR) Newsletter.

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The Digital Life Style for Women

In Australia and the USA there are now more female undergraduates--right across the board, except in computer science and engineering, which is an issue we need to address --than there are males

And it's partly as a result of the pressures of the information revolution.

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Where Have Women Gone and Will They Be Returning

The Incredible Shrinking Pipeline (Camp 1997) describes a serious problem for computer science (CS) professionals everywhere. CS continually loses women at all stages of the pipeline including elementary, middle, and high schools, college, graduate school and beyond. Thus, the computing industry has lost access to a large pool of potential computer professionals.

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Forbidden Technology

A review of: The Technology of Orgasm; "Hysteria," the Vibrator, and Women's Sexual Satisfaction. By Rachel P. Maines. The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

This article is part of a special issue of the Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR) Newsletter.

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