Cultural Relevance, Equity, and Diversity

Scientist goes mad for philanthropy and teaching 

This year’s Harlem Children Society students – some from families torn apart by incarceration, others first generation immigrants from countries as far flung as Ghana and Guyana, and all promising students who qualify for free lunch – will meet their mentors, who are reknowned scientists at leading research institutions, for the first time at an induction ceremony at NYU’s Kimmel Center.  The students will celebrate their accomplishments in two hallmark events: the HCS Science Boat Cruise and the Harlem Science Parade & Street Fair & Festival.

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Getting NYC teens into science

Expanding the minds of teenagers, and their career options, is the goal of the Harlem Children Society. The non-profit places low-income high school students in real working labs all over the city and gives them stipends. It was founded 10 years ago by Dr. Sat Bhattacharya, a molecular geneticist and cancer researcher who works at Sloan Kettering and Rockefeller University. By offering internships with pretigious science and medical labls, Dr.

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Awakening the 'tech' in girls' brains

Developed in 2007, COMPUGIRLS is an ITEST project that serves 60 girls in underserved school districts in the Phoenix-metro area.  The girls, who are predominantly Hispanic, Native American and African-American, can begin the program as eighth graders and participate in six distinct courses, meeting four times a week for five weeks. In addition to advancing techno-social skills, they learn to improve their writing, conduct interviews, draft proposals, and research using the Internet, as well as ASU’s online library.

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Helping students reach higher

ITEST project Reach for the Sky brings innovative curricula and activities in STEM disciplines to the White Earth students over a five-week span. This program is particularly beneficial because it makes STEM culturally relevant to local Anishinaabe youth.

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SRI International, TERC and Girls Inc. partner with AC Transit to inspire high school girls to create greener public transportation solutions

SRI International, Girls Incorporated of Alameda County (Girls Inc.), TERC, andAlameda - Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) announced a new, scalable community action project, "Green Riders: Innovative Transportation Systems." This project, which is part of the ITEST InnovaTE3 project, guides girls in developing real-world innovations for their own community and serves as a model for youth development programs that promote youth-led science and engineering projects.

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Growing, from berries to tech

Launched in 2007 by ETR Associates, a Scotts Valley-based nonprofit focused on health, education and social service issues, Watsonville TEC (also known as ITEST project Animando a Estudiantes con Technologia) has grown from a small program serving middle school girls (known as the ITEST Girl Game Company) to include video game programming classes for middle school boys, separate computer skills tutorials for fifth graders and for parents, and expanded to more schools.

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TEC program director applauded

The under-representation of Latinos in fields like computer science and engineering troubled Watsonville TEC director Jacob Martinez and led him into a career where he teaches technology to students as early as the fifth grade.  Watsonville TEC (also known as ITEST project Animando a Estudiantes con Technologia) is an after school program that will be in 14 Watsonville elementary and middle schools this year.

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'Savvy' tech students coming from Watsonville schools

Watsonville High junior Stephanie Barraza won a national award for Aspirations in Computing from the National Center for Women and Information Technology in December. Barraza was one of 35 young women selected for the honor from more than 1,110 applicants, and she is just the next in a long line of Watsonville TEC graduates to garner accolades.

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Planting the Seeds for a Diverse U.S. STEM Pipeline: A Compendium of Best Practice K-12 STEM Education Programs

The Girl Game Company, an ITEST program, was featured among 38 best practice programs in the 2010 edition of the Bayer Corporation's Planting the Seeds for a Diverse US STEM Pipeline:  A Compendium of Best Practice K-12 STEM Education Programs. 

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Teen girls discover digital technology as ‘COMPUGIRLS’

Dr. Kimberly Scott is the principal investigator and creator of a National Science Foundation-funded ITEST project COMPUGIRLS, an innovative technology program designed to teach girls of color how to use technology to bring about social change. She was concerned with the low participation of young women from higher needs school districts in STEM, so Scott developed COMPUGIRLS from a program she initiated at Hofstra University in New York.

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